Social Media People need to STFU and GBTW too.

Note: the “too” in the headline is a reference connecting this post to a previous one about media companies needing to STFU and, well, you know.

I’ve really had it up to here with Social Media Experts (including, and sometimes especially, those who go on rants about social media experts as if they aren’t ones themselves) going on and on and on about how twitter is a fundamental paradigm shift and how important it is that everyone learn how to do it the “right” way by listening to them.

Here are some things that really piss me off (not just me, either)

  • If you’re at a conference that you paid to get into?  Be at the conference.  Don’t spend 90% of your time tweeting what the people on stage are saying.  You’re not a participant, you’re a court reporter.  And it annoys the HELL out of people who follow you because you’re making an assumption that they’re interested in whats going on at this conference enough to eat up some significant portion of their real estate.
  • Here are some topics that you can just shut up about right now.
  • I’m interesting, so everyone must be interested in how I use twitter. (also known as ‘hey I joined a site,I must be an expert! syndrome).
  • Number of followers don’t matter even though I have thousands and that’s why I’m here attending/speaking at this conference
  • The shifting business paradigm making it so much easier to get paid to chat all day.
  • Listening is the new talking even though I’m talking about listening without actually listening
  • Posts entitled “What _____ can teach us about social media”? Shut up. Not everything is about Social Media. The world is bigger than that. Filtering everything through the SM lens narrows the ability of people to take larger messages, lessons and tools from the things going on around.  And isn’t that the point?
  • Just because a company has a PR mishap or doesn’t do something according to your own arbitrary rules of how companies should be run (whether or not you’ve ever worked in the industry in question, at a company of that size, or at a company at all), doesn’t mean they FAIL or that it’s a CATASTROPHE or and they’re OBVIOUSLY OUT OF TOUCH. Shut up. Nobody wants to read your blog posts about it except other people like you.

We get it. That’s why we’re using the site.

Also: DO something. If you can’t cite specific examples of ways you’ve used stuff you’re talking about to help a company you work for? Shut up.  You know what helps people to learn? Show, don’t tell.

It is your job to provide the maximum value per-interaction as possible, right? That’s what it says on your linkedin profiles? If your value proposition (I think I just threw up in my mouth a little) to people who pay attention to you (be it online or in person) is spouting confucian words of wisdom about marketing and being a stenographer in rooms full of people also being stenographers (especially if you complain about people getting information for free that you paid for), then maybe you shouldn’t be a Social Media rockstar in the first place.

How did a group of people that are supposed to be all about effective communication of ideas and authentic interpersonal relationships devolve into such self-congratulatory ego-fed bullshit?  As @davewiner has taken to saying: “Dude! No One Cares!”

STFU and GBTW.  And no, your job isn’t building your personal brand.

Rant over.

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C.B. Whittemore

Jeremy, I agree completely. I mentally run away from the people you describe. Their behavior highlights that they just don’t get all that is happening in the marketplace. Thanks, too, for the link to Beth’s post. CB

David Hollis

Great blog post and I agree the self congratulatory flaggellation is so 2008 lol

Daria Steigman

Hi Jeremy,

Great post, and clearly the counterbalance to Beth’s “Social Media Leeches” post. I love your comment about the “ego-fed” in this space, although no different than anywhere else (it’s just that the technology makes it more visible). And I’d so like people to write on the blackboard 100 times: it’s not all about social media.

I have to say that I don’t mind people tweeting from conferences; I tend to tune it out most of the time unless it’s really interesting–and I have the time to spend watching a feed for hours on end. (As if…) But I do like the nuggets of wisdom when I see them pass by; after all, I’m selecting followers who offer me value in one form or another.

By the way, I think you might have better said that “talking is the new listening.”

Best,
Daria
.-= Daria Steigman´s last blog ..What Twitter Tells Us about Innovation in America =-.

Beth Harte

“DO something. If you can’t cite specific examples of ways you’ve used stuff you’re talking about to help a company you work for? Shut up. You know what helps people to learn? Show, don’t tell.”

Most people get paid for this…Regardless of what most think this is about business.

As for telling companies what’s right or wrong, I am in totally agreement with you there. It’s all speculation if you aren’t on the inside. That’s why I shared Ramon DeLeon’s (Domino’s Chicago) story…to counter-balance everyone going after Dominos.

Jeremy, the beauty of social media is that if you don’t like what you are hearing, chose new people to follow that don’t anger you and recreate your social environment…they choice is yours. If social media folks provide little value to you stop following them. It’s really that simple.
.-= Beth Harte´s last blog ..The Social Media Leech =-.

Rick Calvert

Great post Jeremy. There are far too many people out there in/famous for nothing other than being popular in the interweb.

Lauren Fernandez

Jeremy –

Sure, the tone can be pretty bad on some of those posts. When I call something a mishap, it’s because the company did not respond in time and start backpedaling. A lot of times, it can be detrimental for a small company. Many are not huge brands, as are many agencies. I think a lot of times, the bad tone comes across from those that are gleeful to point out others’ mistakes and not take responsibility for their own.

I think conference specific feeds are great for my organization – because in an association, our members are first. It’s not about how much money we make. It’s about retention. The events are for them – its not for our bank account.
.-= Lauren Fernandez´s last blog ..Men in PR: What’s the Big Deal? =-.

Guy LeCharles Gonzalez

You’ve been extra cranky lately, no?

I share some of your frustrations here, but I’d argue that it’s partly your own fault. Why are you following 2,000+ people? Why are you interacting with people who are clearly using Twitter as an enhanced narrowcasting medium to boost their own “credibility”?

I’ve found Twitter to be a great resource to connect with smart people in publishing and marketing, and I aggressively manage who I’m following and who follows me. I’ve dropped most of the so-called “gurus” because their simple-minded “Duh” statements that get retweeted a million times are annoying. I unfollowed Beth Harte after her anti-social rant about people critiquing conference tweets. I block every Twitter scammer I can identify that follows me hoping for the auto-follow.

The beauty (and limitation) of Twitter is that it’s ultimately what YOU make of it. YOU control the quality of information that enters your stream. Perhaps it’s time for a stronger filter?
.-= Guy LeCharles Gonzalez´s last blog ..Not Every Conversation is Worth Having =-.

Christopher S. Penn

“Listening is the new talking even though I’m talking about listening without actually listening”.

THIS.

Lauren Fernandez

I am one that actually finds value in those that tweet from conferences. I can’t afford to attend most of them because I am the only PR/SM person working for a national association. They do not have the money to spend on travel, and many conferences do not happen in Texas. Do I wish I could attend? Of course. This is the best way that I can – and learn from those that engage me daily. I am not all knowing and I can learn something from everything said.

I’d like to briefly touch on this point: Just because a company has a PR mishap…. doesn’t mean they FAIL or that it’s a CATASTROPHE or and they’re OBVIOUSLY OUT OF TOUCH. Shut up. Nobody wants to read your blog posts about it except other people like you.

Most in the PR field learn best from case studies. We have classes devoted to it in college. The best at crisis communications are constantly reading on these “mishaps” and the analysis of a professional – what they can do to improve, what went wrong, etc. Many of these companies do not address the problem and don’t learn from it. How we become better is from learning from these mishaps. Don’t degrade something that most professionals I know learn from.

I plan to tweet from a separate account for our national convention. This is so those members who can’t attend for distance and financial reasons can see what happens. The horror.

Jeremy Meyers

Lauren-

I absolutely don’t have a problem with PR challenges being used as case studies. What I do have a problem with is the tone and gratuitous hyperbole of the commentary being thrown about in assorted blog posts. A single PR issue does not mean DISASTER for a company. They can learn just like any other person or group can, and chances are have recovered from worse.

Conference tweets sent from dedicated accounts are fine (although I still argue that if you’re tweeting what is being said on stage from a conference, you’re wasting your money), its the sudden influx of ‘xyz says twitter means this #conferencehashtag’ that has nothing to do with why I choose to interact with you. Tell me ABOUT what happened, dont just repeat it. You’re not a parrot.

Sasha H. Muradali

lol, oooh someone sounds a tad angry. But I get it.

I think you raised one specific good point –> citing specific examples.

How can someone trust you, or know what you are really capable of doing without any examples.

But on that same note, just because someone doesn’t have am ample kitchen of examples, doesn’t mean they don’t know.

Some people have different ways of expressing themselves and their thoughts.

Obviously this is their choice, and it is the choice of oneself not to listen.

That being said re:Conferences — depending on the person, it could or could not be interesting to read a set of Tweets.

For example, one Event Planning mishap I blogged about was based on the Romantic Times Convention held in Orlando.

A lot of the “dirt” on why it was an event planning mess came not only from emails of people complaining about certain things — but specifically tweets via Twitter with the hash tag #RT09.

So it’s relative.

Now would I do that if I went to a conference? Probably not. However, would I tweet if something caught my ears or eyes, and wanted to drop a one-liner to my fellow Tweeps? Yes.

Then even, everyone is different. I think it’s important to remember that.
.-= Sasha H. Muradali´s last blog ..{Tickled Pink} Freedom is… =-.

Keith Burtis

This is a great post. I especially love the line about social media becomig too ego-centric. I think the folks that are successful in SM are able to eat their own ego and do things because they are genuine rather than self-centered. This is a great wake up call for many, however I am betting the unfortunate situation is that the folks that abuse the system wont even listen.

The other part I love is about the folks that have ever done this for a company or have ever worked for a company of that size or scope. I work for a HUGE company and there are challenges everyday to incorporate the social media space. In fact Scoble threw his 2 cents in saying that we were not social enough! There is a guy who lives in his own bubble! It takes time, effort, and PROOF OF CONCEPT to change.

Great rant and I think it needed to be said!
.-= Keith Burtis´s last blog ..One to One “Skype is my Twitter” =-.

Tim Sears

Nice, I love it. Particularly with how often I’ve seen talks recently where nobody has done anything, it truly is all just talk.

I think people are looking for experts, or at least the leading and guiding voices. If you aren’t an expert, then why are you speaking at a conference or a panel?

I’m not sure I completely agree with the conference rant. I’ve found myself getting excited about the information and interactions around me, and a natural outlet for that is to tweet. I’d like to believe that some of my followers find that information interesting, but then again, how well do I really know my followers? Different can of worms, I suppose.
.-= Tim Sears´s last blog ..Twitter Relevancy and the Fall of Censorship =-.

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@JeremyMeyers LOVED the ‘Twitter: It’s just a Website Post’ [link to post] – Mind if I add some of your commentary on YouSTFU.com ??

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Twitter Comment


Just discovered @jeremymeyers. “Just b/c a co…doesn’t do something according to your own arbitrary rules…” [link to post]

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trackback

Twitter Comment


@JeremyMeyers – Bingo. My point on this is that it’s the network effect that’s bringing change – not the technology that enables it.

– Posted using Chat Catcher

C.B. Whittemore

Jeremy, I agree completely. I mentally run away from the people you describe. Their behavior highlights that they just don’t get all that is happening in the marketplace. Thanks, too, for the link to Beth’s post. CB

David Hollis

Great blog post and I agree the self congratulatory flaggellation is so 2008 lol

Daria Steigman

Hi Jeremy,

Great post, and clearly the counterbalance to Beth’s “Social Media Leeches” post. I love your comment about the “ego-fed” in this space, although no different than anywhere else (it’s just that the technology makes it more visible). And I’d so like people to write on the blackboard 100 times: it’s not all about social media.

I have to say that I don’t mind people tweeting from conferences; I tend to tune it out most of the time unless it’s really interesting–and I have the time to spend watching a feed for hours on end. (As if…) But I do like the nuggets of wisdom when I see them pass by; after all, I’m selecting followers who offer me value in one form or another.

By the way, I think you might have better said that “talking is the new listening.”

Best,
Daria
.-= Daria Steigman´s last blog ..What Twitter Tells Us about Innovation in America =-.

trackback

Twitter Comment


@jeremymeyers you are so right though. social media gurus: show us YOUR case studies or shut up :>) [link to post]

– Posted using Chat Catcher

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FriendFeed Comment


Social Media People need to STFU and GBTW too. | Jeremy Meyers dot com – Good read with some excellent points. [link to post]

– Posted using Chat Catcher

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Enjoying #rants today! RT @blogworld: RT @KeithBurtis: Rant by @JeremyMeyers -what he’d call “Social Media Douchebags!”[link to post]

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Jeremy (@JeremyMeyers) rants. Do you agree? [link to post]

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Chuckled @JeremyMeyers Listening is the new talking even though I’m talking about listening without actually listening [link to post]

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RT @KeithBurtis: Rant by @JeremyMeyers on what I would cal “Social Media Douchebags!” [link to post]

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Twitter Comment


Actually I have to raise my hand as guilty on one or two of these. Good post by @jeremymeyers [link to post]

– Posted using Chat Catcher

Twitter Comment


@JeremyMeyers Why are you so cranky in this new post??? [link to post]

– Posted using Chat Catcher

Beth Harte

“DO something. If you can’t cite specific examples of ways you’ve used stuff you’re talking about to help a company you work for? Shut up. You know what helps people to learn? Show, don’t tell.”

Most people get paid for this…Regardless of what most think this is about business.

As for telling companies what’s right or wrong, I am in totally agreement with you there. It’s all speculation if you aren’t on the inside. That’s why I shared Ramon DeLeon’s (Domino’s Chicago) story…to counter-balance everyone going after Dominos.

Jeremy, the beauty of social media is that if you don’t like what you are hearing, chose new people to follow that don’t anger you and recreate your social environment…they choice is yours. If social media folks provide little value to you stop following them. It’s really that simple.
.-= Beth Harte´s last blog ..The Social Media Leech =-.

Rick Calvert

Great post Jeremy. There are far too many people out there in/famous for nothing other than being popular in the interweb.

Lauren Fernandez

Jeremy –

Sure, the tone can be pretty bad on some of those posts. When I call something a mishap, it’s because the company did not respond in time and start backpedaling. A lot of times, it can be detrimental for a small company. Many are not huge brands, as are many agencies. I think a lot of times, the bad tone comes across from those that are gleeful to point out others’ mistakes and not take responsibility for their own.

I think conference specific feeds are great for my organization – because in an association, our members are first. It’s not about how much money we make. It’s about retention. The events are for them – its not for our bank account.
.-= Lauren Fernandez´s last blog ..Men in PR: What’s the Big Deal? =-.

Guy LeCharles Gonzalez

You’ve been extra cranky lately, no?

I share some of your frustrations here, but I’d argue that it’s partly your own fault. Why are you following 2,000+ people? Why are you interacting with people who are clearly using Twitter as an enhanced narrowcasting medium to boost their own “credibility”?

I’ve found Twitter to be a great resource to connect with smart people in publishing and marketing, and I aggressively manage who I’m following and who follows me. I’ve dropped most of the so-called “gurus” because their simple-minded “Duh” statements that get retweeted a million times are annoying. I unfollowed Beth Harte after her anti-social rant about people critiquing conference tweets. I block every Twitter scammer I can identify that follows me hoping for the auto-follow.

The beauty (and limitation) of Twitter is that it’s ultimately what YOU make of it. YOU control the quality of information that enters your stream. Perhaps it’s time for a stronger filter?
.-= Guy LeCharles Gonzalez´s last blog ..Not Every Conversation is Worth Having =-.

Christopher S. Penn

“Listening is the new talking even though I’m talking about listening without actually listening”.

THIS.

Lauren Fernandez

I am one that actually finds value in those that tweet from conferences. I can’t afford to attend most of them because I am the only PR/SM person working for a national association. They do not have the money to spend on travel, and many conferences do not happen in Texas. Do I wish I could attend? Of course. This is the best way that I can – and learn from those that engage me daily. I am not all knowing and I can learn something from everything said.

I’d like to briefly touch on this point: Just because a company has a PR mishap…. doesn’t mean they FAIL or that it’s a CATASTROPHE or and they’re OBVIOUSLY OUT OF TOUCH. Shut up. Nobody wants to read your blog posts about it except other people like you.

Most in the PR field learn best from case studies. We have classes devoted to it in college. The best at crisis communications are constantly reading on these “mishaps” and the analysis of a professional – what they can do to improve, what went wrong, etc. Many of these companies do not address the problem and don’t learn from it. How we become better is from learning from these mishaps. Don’t degrade something that most professionals I know learn from.

I plan to tweet from a separate account for our national convention. This is so those members who can’t attend for distance and financial reasons can see what happens. The horror.

Jeremy

Lauren-

I absolutely don’t have a problem with PR challenges being used as case studies. What I do have a problem with is the tone and gratuitous hyperbole of the commentary being thrown about in assorted blog posts. A single PR issue does not mean DISASTER for a company. They can learn just like any other person or group can, and chances are have recovered from worse.

Conference tweets sent from dedicated accounts are fine (although I still argue that if you’re tweeting what is being said on stage from a conference, you’re wasting your money), its the sudden influx of ‘xyz says twitter means this #conferencehashtag’ that has nothing to do with why I choose to interact with you. Tell me ABOUT what happened, dont just repeat it. You’re not a parrot.

Sasha H. Muradali

lol, oooh someone sounds a tad angry. But I get it.

I think you raised one specific good point –> citing specific examples.

How can someone trust you, or know what you are really capable of doing without any examples.

But on that same note, just because someone doesn’t have am ample kitchen of examples, doesn’t mean they don’t know.

Some people have different ways of expressing themselves and their thoughts.

Obviously this is their choice, and it is the choice of oneself not to listen.

That being said re:Conferences — depending on the person, it could or could not be interesting to read a set of Tweets.

For example, one Event Planning mishap I blogged about was based on the Romantic Times Convention held in Orlando.

A lot of the “dirt” on why it was an event planning mess came not only from emails of people complaining about certain things — but specifically tweets via Twitter with the hash tag #RT09.

So it’s relative.

Now would I do that if I went to a conference? Probably not. However, would I tweet if something caught my ears or eyes, and wanted to drop a one-liner to my fellow Tweeps? Yes.

Then even, everyone is different. I think it’s important to remember that.
.-= Sasha H. Muradali´s last blog ..{Tickled Pink} Freedom is… =-.

Keith Burtis

This is a great post. I especially love the line about social media becomig too ego-centric. I think the folks that are successful in SM are able to eat their own ego and do things because they are genuine rather than self-centered. This is a great wake up call for many, however I am betting the unfortunate situation is that the folks that abuse the system wont even listen.

The other part I love is about the folks that have ever done this for a company or have ever worked for a company of that size or scope. I work for a HUGE company and there are challenges everyday to incorporate the social media space. In fact Scoble threw his 2 cents in saying that we were not social enough! There is a guy who lives in his own bubble! It takes time, effort, and PROOF OF CONCEPT to change.

Great rant and I think it needed to be said!
.-= Keith Burtis´s last blog ..One to One “Skype is my Twitter” =-.

Tim Sears

Nice, I love it. Particularly with how often I’ve seen talks recently where nobody has done anything, it truly is all just talk.

I think people are looking for experts, or at least the leading and guiding voices. If you aren’t an expert, then why are you speaking at a conference or a panel?

I’m not sure I completely agree with the conference rant. I’ve found myself getting excited about the information and interactions around me, and a natural outlet for that is to tweet. I’d like to believe that some of my followers find that information interesting, but then again, how well do I really know my followers? Different can of worms, I suppose.
.-= Tim Sears´s last blog ..Twitter Relevancy and the Fall of Censorship =-.

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